This post is the third in a blood type-based lifestyle series based the information found in “Live Right 4 Your Type” by Dr. Peter J. D’Adamo. I have already written about how the mind-body connection (https://annebacher.com/mind-body-connection-to-blood-type/) and digestion (https://annebacher.com/digestion-and-blood-type/) are connected to each blood type.

If this is your first time learning about metabolism, I invite you to read a post I wrote several months ago to understand some basics about this amazing body function: https://annebacher.com/metabolism-new-year-new-you/  Metabolism is basically the rate at which your body processes food into energy. There are two types of metabolism:

  • Anabolism – the synthesis or buildup of substances: simpler molecules are used to build more complex compounds like proteins for growth and repair of tissues
  • Catabolism – the breakdown of organic compounds (especially food) to provide heat and energy

The topic of metabolism has fascinated me since I was young, when I was told that I had low metabolism. I was considered chubby (I was “padded” until I was in my mid-teens, when I started to eat more of the foods that I really liked). I also had extremely low blood pressure until and unless I was drinking copious amounts of caffeine (also started lots of coffee and black tea in my mid-teens). I felt lightheaded when standing up quickly from stooping or bending over. I never felt really dizzy or sluggish, but the facts were the facts. And there was also my lifelong dance with allergies of all kinds and asthma (abated more and more over the past dozen years as I have fine-tuned my eating and incorporated essential oils into my daily regimen). It wasn’t until I discovered the Blood Type Diet and personalized nutrition based on my B blood type that I began to realize that all of these conditions were based on how I was eating and were/are absolutely subject to improvement.

With this post, I hope to highlight the key considerations that you personally should investigate based on your blood type. Even though you may feel that you are in great health right now, you will want to be alert to the metabolic issues that arise over time. If you have difficulty losing weight, you may be experiencing the results of poor metabolic functioning. When this is the case, vigorous exercise and cutting calories won’t give you the results you want. In fact, you may be making the situation worse.

DIFFERENCES IN MANIFESTATIONS, RISKS, AND VARIATIONS ACROSS BLOOD TYPES

BLOOD TYPE O

Blood type O individuals tend to have low levels of blood clotting factors. Because of their ancient dietary needs, they are designed to use calories very efficiently.

Manifestations

  • “Thinner” blood
  • Bleeding disorders
  • Poor utilization of carbohydrates
  • High carbohydrate diet leads to:
    • Edema and an increase in body fat
    • Elevated levels of triglycerides
    • Promotion of insulin resistance
    • Hypothyroidism (underperforming thyroid)

Risks

  • Stroke (caused by bleeding in the brain
  • High risk factors for diabetes and heart disease when metabolism is not in a balanced state
  • High carbohydrate diets promote Syndrome X, a condition leading to heart disease

Variations

  • Non-secretors have an even higher risk of Syndrome X than secretors

 

BLOOD TYPE A

Blood type A individuals have high levels of blood-clotting factors.

Manifestations

  • “Thicker” blood – blood tends to aggregate and clots more easily

Risks

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Cerebral thrombosis
  • Problematic in the presence of cancer

Variations

  • Elderly have increased risk of strokes from embolisms (blood clots blocking arteries)
  • Elderly have increased risk of occlusive (involving blockages) heart diseases

BLOOD TYPE B

Blood type B individuals are extremely sensitive to the affect of lectins. This is reflected in metabolic balance problems. (Personal note: this is why I try to eat only items from my beneficials lists and why, as I age, I have seen the effects of some items on my neutral lists go from benign to upsetting).

Manifestations

  • Lectins slow metabolism
  • Lectins create insulin resistance

Risks

  • Hypoglycermia
  • Obesity
  • “Leaky gut”

Variations

  • Elderly tend to experience lack of libido

BLOOD TYPE AB

Regarding metabolism, Blood type AB individuals have the same profile as type A individuals: high levels of blood-clotting factors.

Manifestations

  • “Thicker” blood – blood tends to aggregate and clots more easily

Risks

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Cerebral thrombosis
  • Problematic in the presence of cancer

Variations

  • Elderly have increased risk of strokes from embolisms (blood clots blocking arteries)
  • Elderly have increased risk of occlusive (involving blockages) heart diseases

 

A STUDY IN CONTRASTS

As you can see from the above, the differences between type O individuals and types A and AB individuals is striking. Whereas Os are fueled and energized by high meat consumption, As and ABs tend to feel sluggish and retain water, giving rise to weight gain and edema.

Blood type O individuals have a significant risk of Syndrome X as a result of metabolic imbalance. Syndrome X (metabolic syndrome) is a condition created by a combination of obesity, high triglycerides, and insulin resistance. Triglycerides are a type of fat (lipid) found in your blood. When you eat, your body converts any calories it doesn’t need to use right away into triglycerides. The triglycerides are stored in your fat cells. Later, hormones release triglycerides for energy between meals. High triglycerides may contribute to hardening of the arteries or thickening of the artery walls (arteriosclerosis) — which increases the risk of stroke, heart attack and heart disease. Extremely high triglycerides can also cause acute inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis).

Blood type A individuals face high rates of cortisol in the face of metabolic imbalance, resulting in increased appetite, obesity, insulin resistance, and hormone imbalance. As tend to “forget” to eat or skip meals early in the day, especially as metabolism slows, and then eat more and more later in the day and into the night. To break the cycle, As should eat reasonable meals at breakfast and lunch, a lighter but adequate early dinner, and nothing after dinner. This helps the naturally slower A metabolism to extract the maximum value from the food that is consumed and resets the body to be hungry at optimal times.

Blood types A and AB individuals are more likely to be at risk of heart disease and death due to elevated cholesterol, the result of overconsumption of high amounts of dietary fat (meat and dairy). These two blood types can use probiotics, lectins from beneficial foods, and variety of food and wellness strategies to help metabolic balance. Minimizing stress also helps these blood types to process beneficial foods optimally.

I can’t wrap up without mentioning the symptoms of metabolic sluggishness in blood type B individuals. Bs can improve just about any and every condition just by eating properly (especially elimination of corn and corn derivatives, wheat, chicken, lentils, peanuts, sesame seeds, and buckwheat; and adding lower fat dairy and lots of seafood) and following general health protocols like appropriate exercise and sleep. Bs should be alert to the following as signs of a sluggish metabolism: fatigue, dry skin, cold hands and feet*, loss of sexual interest, constipation* and water retention, and lightheadedness on standing*. I experienced all three of these * conditions regularly for most of my life before finding the Blood Type Diet.

Do you know how well your metabolism is functioning? Wellness Made Simple is here to help you to understand your specific needs to achieve metabolic balance. There are nutritional supplements, dietary tweaks, and stress management techniques that can support you as simple adds to your daily regimen. Achieving proper metabolism can literally be a lifesaver, friend!

Wellness Made Simple is here to help you simplify the way YOU do well…for life!

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